Rob Bockman: Costume Party

Southern Legitimacy Statement: A resident of South Carolina and a graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Rob…

Ronnie Sirmans: 4ever

Southern Legitimacy Statement: I was born and raised in Georgia and that’s where I’ve returned. I’ve worked at Southern newspapers. And…

Joe Halstead: Hoppy

SOUTHERN LEGITIMACY STATEMENT: It’s kind of wild where I grew up. I had my own gun at six years old.…

Memoirs on the Dead Mule

The Dead Mule speaks in many voices. Mule Essays lead the mind into myriad swamps of distant memories or new…

Justin Evans Poetry

SLS: Though I was not born or raised in the South, I have lived in Georgia, Texas, and in North…

Sidney Kidd: The Day I Grew Up

Southern Legitimacy Statement: I reckon my statement should include things I take for granted even as I attempt to ignore…

Willie Smith: One Handful

Southern Legitimacy Statement: I was born in Greenbelt, Maryland and left that Yankee-leaning state at age 3 to spend the next…

Gracjan Kraszewski: American Believer

Southern Legitimacy Statement:  “American Believer” … is told through an antihero’s perspective and employs humor to ask deeply serious theological and…

Ferdinand Hunter: Evan’s Lament

Southern Legitimacy Statement:  I grew up in a small Georgia town and spent my childhood summers in Vicksburg, Mississippi. Since then…

September Fiction and All

One week left before the Dead Mule publishes its October 2016 issue. Get your fill of September this week and…

Allison Thorpe: Five Poems

SLS – I’ve swallowed moonshine and lived to brag about it; escaped a copperhead’s randy tongue; ridden a tobacco setter…

Convalescence by Alan Steele

Southern Legitimacy Statement: I’m from a small town just outside Cowtown (Fort Worth to those who don’t know better), with white gravel roads that claimed my front teeth one time and the skin off my knees and hands a few more times. I’m from a place that meant running around with no shirt or shoes from May to September, trips to Mott’s 5 and 10, and visits to grandma down around Houston to work the fields, each her famous drop cookies, and help her cook pie or cobbler or wild grape jelly. Dad was a cop and mom stayed home, and I’m still close by, though the town has changed and the light in town has a few new friends and a new toll road for competition. The fire department closest is still volunteer and football will always be king on Friday night.